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3145 Citizenship between cosmopolitanism and globalization

Room: C4.07

 

According to Beck, cosmopolitanism is a “Global sense, a sense of boundarylessness. An everyday, historically alert, reflexive awareness of ambivalences in a milieu of blurring differentiations and cultural contradictions. It reveals not just the ‘anguish’ but also the possibility of shaping one’s life and social relations under conditions of cultural mixture. It is simultaneously a skeptical, disillusioned, self-critical outlook”    (Beck U. 2006, Cosmopolitan Vision, Cambridge, Polity Press).  In other words, a cosmopolitan way of life is the necessary consequence of a globalized world, where the Lebenswelt more ad more depends on immaterial and disembedded (Giddens, The consequences of modernity, 1991) processes. In such a context, more and more individuals are developing self-representations and life-styles characterizing by weak local ties and high rates of mobility, both geographical and professional. Also due of the growing flows of migrants and refugees, the need is strong for supranational norms (such as the case of European Union) that grant the opportunity for individual to move across different areas of the world, beyond national legislations. This entails deep changes in the notion of citizenship, whose traditions link with nation-states sounds more and more anachronistic.

 

This panel welcomes theoretical reflections, case studies,empirical research or scenario analyses  on law-making and policy  modelling processes related to the evolution of the norms on citizenship into a cosmopolitan and global direction. It aims to  analyze some social changes derivatives on globalization process, their interdependence and global consequences.

 

More in details, the focus will be  the concept of citizenship and its evolution since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The processes of definition of citizens are always more dependent on models, patterns relationships and situations that occur in distant places with respect to the physical space within which their biography is materially lived (Session organized by Sara Petroccia).

 

Chair: Sara Petroccia | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara-Italy

 

Discussant: Luigi Cominelli | Università degli Studi di Milano

Andrea Pitasi | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Emilia Ferone | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Sara Petroccia | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Reforming  the 1948 UN Declaration – Towards a supranational citizenship

 

Abstract

 

The aim of this  work is to provide a  legislative nalysis nd  technical upgrade of the  UN DECLARATION promulgaed  on December 10th  1948 so that  this  key document might kep on being inspiring and    upgraded to the current   global and complex scenarios.    The key perspective  is   turning the Declaration into    a key  legislative tool  to  rethink  citiznship   in our times and for the next future.
For example , whereever the Declaration uses  “ Everyone, in article 2  for instance, the new formula would be   “ everyone, as a world citizen… “
Art 2 and 28 would be  focused also  on a general upgrade   Beck would have defined “ beyond methodological nationalism “. Also artt  13- 15    would require  an upgrade towards this direction.    Article 15 , paragraph 1  for example would   be revised to  introduce  “ citizenship  “ instead of “ nationality “ to underline hat  citizenship has  a broader status han nationality   as   in the European Union Citizenship.
In Article 2  for example  the  changes might be a sfolows :
Everyone, as  a   world citizen ,  is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status as    world citizenship or , supernational one , prevails  on nation state ones. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty as    once again the    key sovereignty   is shifted to the  supra national   and  world order   policy modelling level.
The legislative function , if  correctly designed , is the key   stargate  for reducing   the  methodological nationalism problem.

Emilia Ferone | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Andrea Pitasi | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Sara Petroccia | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Global, transnational and cosmopolitan sociology

 

Abstract

 

This work analyzes some social changes derivatives on globalization process, their interdependence and global consequences.  More in details, the  focus of this paper is the concept of citizenship and its evolution.  The processes of definition of citizens are always more dependent from models, relationships and situations that occur in distant places with respect to the physical space within which their biography is materially lived. The privileged audience of our citizenship narratives is not necessarily placed in the contexts of our material life and it  nor constitute part of  networks of our direct relations. Instead, it can be reached in mediated ways and  can be part of a virtual or a spatially imaginative context of reference. The growing interdependence and the contemporary erosion and multiplication of boundaries make it possible to think of oneself as freed from local ties, in constant motion, immersed in global flows that enable remote relationships, the rapid transition from one context to another and the ability to overcome and establish distinctions. They allow individuals to recognize themselves within a cosmopolitan outlook, which could  mean: “Global sense, a sense of boundarylessness. An everyday, historically alert, reflexive awareness of ambivalence in a milieu of blurring differentiations and cultural contradictions. It reveals not just the ‘anguish’ but also the possibility of shaping one’s life and social relations under conditions of cultural mixture. It is simultaneously a skeptical, disillusioned, self-critical outlook” (Beck  U., 2000).

Massimiliano Ruzzeddu  | Università Niccolò Cusano

Active citizenship, urban regeneration and law-making.

 

Abstract

 

The consequences of 2008 crisis have been not only poverty, unemployment and social strains; the bankruptcy of commercial and financial companies, as well as public bodies, have caused the abandon of a high number of urban areas, such as malls, theaters, factories, military houses, parks etc. Thus, a frequent scenario in many Western areas has been the coexistence of a large number of jobless social actors and of empty public places.
While, in many cases, those buildings have been occupied by squatters or extremist activists, in other cases occupants were not ‘anti-system’.
Thus, we have many examples, especially in European cities, where abandoned buildings or green areas, have turned into free aggregation centers for the local community, cultural centers, or even social economy hubs. This implies both the recovery of urban estates that were risking to collapse, and the provision of free/cheap services to citizens.
 In other words, we are witnessing that urban regeneration is not only the outcome of private investments or top down politics, but also the outcome of bottom up activism.
Thus, new kinds of relationship are emerging between citizens and law-making institutions: within the framework of active citizenship, the social demands that voters express, are not anymore just the provision of services, but also the official acknowledgment of their contribution to common good building. As a matter of fact, after a while since they started their activity, -one or two years- and a lot of work, the group can hope to demonstrate the social utility of what they have done so far, and ask for a formal recognition.
Within this framework, two main questions are to be taken into consideration. The first is the authority involved: the diversity of legal needs of these groups of citizens are so diverse, and so are the pertinent juridical norms, that either local, or national or even European law-makers can make the institutional referent.
On the other side, it is necessary to investigate the kind on norm that appears necessary case by case, both in formal terms (law, decree, etc.), both in contents (recognition of public utility, fund granting, etc.).
This paper aims at drawing theoretical models of interaction between active citizenships and lawmakers, in order to provide tools for the comprehension of such phenomena and effective intervention on analogous phenomena.

Sara Petroccia | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara-Italy

Emilia Ferone | Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Global resilience in European Societies

 

Abstract

 

The objective of this study is the analysis of the emergency for new forms of sociality, from the transformation of the traditional ones: increasing productivity, supporting business, promoting sustainable and renewable development; opening culture to contemporary times and make it an engine for development; achieving an integrated territorial vision and ensure adequate personal protection and high social cohesion.
This paper aims to analyze  the cognitive strategies that enable institutional and public actors to support the local and global resilience  with reference to the implementation of intangible factors such as : social capital, social cohesion,  construction and socialization of innovation,  good practices of a territorial intelligence and of a good governance.
A new the paradigm is necessary, where the social cohesion is a premise and not as a result of the development and where a broadest participation of citizens in the decision making processes of governance can support the sustainable human development.
Social systems must learn to become capable of transforming themselves without intolerable disruption. But they will not cease to be dynamically conservative.
A learning system, then, must be one in which dynamic conservatism operates at such a level and in such a way as to permit change of state without intolerable threat to the essential functions the system fulfils for the self. Our systems need to maintain their identity, and their ability to support the self-identity of those who belong to them, but they must at the same time be capable of frequently transforming themselves (Schön, 1973: 57).

 

 

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